State Legislation

advoday 1The National Partnership’s California Network Team works with a wide variety of partners to address critical policy issues that affect the health and physical activity of youth and families in California. Our strategy is collaborative and seeks the support of  individuals, schools, agencies, and organizations throughout our state.

 

Here are the bills that the Safe Routes to School National Partnership is sponsoring or supporting in 2016:

Transportation Equity Package

We are excited to be working with our statewide coalition partners to advance a number of bills in this year’s legislative session, including a Transportation Equity Package of bills that together will improve sustainable, affordable transportation options across the state, especially for low-income Californians.

Notably for Safe Routes to School advocates, AB 2796 would create a set-aside within the Active Transportation Program (ATP) for non-infrastructure and planning. We see this as a critical piece of legislation since both types of projects are competing against large infrastructure projects in the ATP and are often at a competitive disadvantage. We are co-sponsoring this bill with the California Bicycle Coalition, and California Walks, and it is being co-sponsored in the legislature by Assembly Members Richard Bloom and Evan Low. A fact sheet is available here.

AB 2796 is part of the Transportation Equity Package along with the following three bills:

  • AB 2332 (E. Garcia): This bill would require the prioritization of State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) and the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) projects that provide meaningful benefits to the mobility and safety needs of disadvantaged community residents, with a minimum funding floor of 35%.
  • AB 2222 (Holden): This bill would continuously appropriate $50 million annually from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund for the Transit Pass Program that will support transit pass programs of public agencies that provide free or reduced-fare transit passes to public school students (K-12) and community college, California State University, and University of California students.
  • AB 1982 (Bloom): This bill would require that an eligible traffic signal synchronization project funded through the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund be timed to move vehicles at an average speed of 12 to 15 miles per hour, an ideal speed for people bicycling.

Check out our partner TransForm’s blog post on the Transportation Equity Package for more details.

Other legislation we are supporting or tracking:

  • AB 1659, which we are sponsoring, would allow communities to expand school zones up to 1,320 feet and lower speed limits to 15 mph within them.
  • AB 1550 Would require the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund investment plan to allocate a minimum of 25% of the available moneys in the fund to projects located within disadvantaged communities and a separate and additional 25% to projects that benefit low-income households.
  • SB 1000 would require cities to add an environmental justice element to their general plans when they update them.
  • SBx1-1 and ABx1-23 from the special session, which would increase funding to ATP and insert complete streets language into existing state transportation funding programs (STIP and SHOPP).
  • AB 2303 Would create special license plates with the proceeds going to fund the Active Transportation Program’s planning projects in disadvantaged communities.

 

In 2015, we sponsored or supported the following bills:

AB 8 (Gatto): Emergency Services – hit-and-run incidents – SUPPORT

Establishes a emergency alert system that would be activated by the California Highway Patrol after a hit-and-run incident that results in the death or injury of an individual. 

AB 156 (Perea): Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 – Disadvantaged Communities – SUPPORT

Appropriates funds from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund to establish a comprehensive technical assistance program to assist disadvantaged communities.

AB 744 (Chau): Planning and Zoning – Density Bonuses – SUPPORT

Reduces parking ratios that cities and counties may impose on new developments that either are/or include affordable housing and within one-half mile of transit.

SBX1-2 (Huff): Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund – OPPOSE

Excludes annual funds generated from transportation fuels sector from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund, and uses these funds for transportation infrastructure, including public streets and highways, but excluding high-speed rail.

SBX1-11 (Berryhill): California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Exemption – Roadway Improvement – OPPOSE

Extends CEQA exemption on road projects that repair or maintain an existing roadway for another 10 years (until January 1, 2025), eliminates the limitation of the exemption for projects in cities and counties with a population of less than 100,000 people, and expands the exemption to include state roadways.

SB 564 (Cannella): School Zone Fines – CO-SPONSOR

Adds a $35 fine to vehicle code violations in posted school zones and directs the additional revenue to the state Active Transportation Program for the specific purpose of school safety projects and programs.

SB 698 (Cannella): Active Transportation Program – CO-SPONSOR

Designates a percentage of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund which is funded with Cap and Trade Program revenue to the Active Transportation Program for the specific purpose of school safety projects and programs.

SB 632 (Cannella): School Zone Expansion – SUPPORT

Allows a jurisdiction, following a traffic study, to extend the size of a school zone where speed limit restrictions apply up to a quarter mile from the school building or grounds. 

 

 

3 Responses to State Legislation

  1. Pingback: Legislative update: SRTS, walk, bike bills advance with strong support | Safe Routes to School in California

  2. Pingback: Updates and New Legislation on SRTS Slate | Safe Routes to School in California

  3. Pingback: One more step for the Safer School Zones Bill, then it’s up to Governor Brown | Safe Routes to School in California

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