Transportation Development Act Article 3 Programs: Inland Empire (SANBAG and RCTC)

Photo courtesy of Dave Dugdale on Flickr

Active transportation funding comes from a plethora of sources, from federal, state, county, local and private funding sources. At the beginning of this year, the Safe Routes to School National Partnership published the Transportation Finance in Los Angeles County: An Overview. Similarly, the National Partnership hopes to grow its expertise in transportation finance into the other Southern California counties and understand what sources of funding can be leveraged for multimodal investments, including active transportation, planning and implementation.

One local source of funds for active transportation – pedestrian and bicycle projects – is the Local Transportation Funds (LTF), which is managed by the relevant county transportation commission (CTC). The LTFs are derived from a ¼ cent sales tax on retail sales statewide. Funds are returned to the county of generation and used mostly for transit operations and transit capital expenses.

Within the LTF the  Transportation Development Act (TDA) Article 3  program allocates 2% of this funding to be returned to counties for bicycle and pedestrian facilities. TDA Article 3 funds must be used exclusively for bicycle or pedestrian facilities and can not be used to supplement roadway improvements. At SANBAG, 20% of the TDA funds available for projects that improve access to transit stops for pedestrians and persons with disabilities. The remaining 80% is allocated to bicycle and pedestrian projects across the county.

The information from the CTCs show the allocation of TDA Article 3 projects for 2013-2014 in the Inland Empire, where Riverside County awarded more pedestrian facility and San Bernardino County awarded more bicycle facility projects. 

Riverside County

Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) issued a call for projects for TDA Article 3 Call for Project in March 2013 and made recommendations for projects on July 10, 2013 to RCTC’s executive committee (agenda item 9D with attachments linked).

  • Through the SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Call for Projects, RCTC received 32 project proposals, totaling $4,004,012 in SB 821 funding requests.
  • Projects were scored based a list of criteria: Use, Safety, Importance as Transportation Alternative, Missing Link/Extension, or Connectivity, Matching Funds, Population Equity, Physical Accessibility Enhancement. See CFP.
  • Eighteen (18) projects totaling $1,780,922 are recommended for funding, where majority of the awarded projects are sidewalk  improvements and construction.

San Bernardino County

The San Benardino County CTC, San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), selected TDA Article 3 Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities and Transit Stop Access Improvement Projects (see page 256-261 in general policy committee agenda June 13, 2013)

  • SANBAG received seventeen (17) Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities project applications from twelve (12) jurisdictions, totally $5,171,751.50 in funding requests.
  • Projects were scored based a list of criteria: Overall Quality of the Project, Potential Use, Connectivity, Destinations Served, Safety, Local Matching Funds, Intermodal Access, Project Readiness/Cost Effectiveness, Timeliness of Prior Project Completion. See agenda.
  • In June 2013, the SANBAG Board approve the award of TDA Article 3 funds for:
    • (1) Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities projects in the amount of $2,997,017, where a majority of the awarded projects were bicycle facilities.
    • (2) Transit Stop Access Improvement projects in the amount of $755,721.

About Pauline Chow
I am the Southern California Regional Policy Manager at Safe Routes to School National Partnership. Living in the foothills of Pasadena, CA. Our mission is to advance safe walking and bicycling to and from schools, to build a diverse and inclusive movement of champions, to foster the creation of active and sustainable communities, and to improve the health and quality of life for all of Los Angeles County’s youth and families. Also, I think internets and people power go together and interested in using data science to explore social justice and civic engagement in the digital space.

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